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5 Facts About Infertility

April 24, 2017

This week is National Infertility Awareness Week. To help spread awareness about those of us who have experienced it, here are five facts about infertility:

1. Infertility is generally defined as not being able to conceive after one year (or more) of unprotected sex. If you’re older than 35, this window may be narrowed down to six months, depending on your health care provider.

2. Around one in eight couples struggle to become pregnant. According to the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) about 12% of women ages 15-44 have difficulty getting pregnant or carrying a pregnancy to term.

3. Both men and women can contribute to infertility. The CDC reports that about 35% of couples with infertility have male and female factors that contribute to their infertility. In about 8% of couples, a male factor is the only detectable cause.

4. There are various ways the infertility can be treated, including medicine, surgery, intrauterine insemination (IUI) or assisted reproductive technology such as in vitro fertilization (IVF). These methods aren’t always successful and can be quite painful.

5. Secondary infertility is real and comprises about 30% of infertility as a whole. Meaning, you can still experience infertility in subsequent pregnancies even after previously successful, easy-to-conceive pregnancies.

For more information regarding infertility and National Infertility Awareness week, please visit the following resources:

http://www.asrm.org/
http://www.inciid.org/
https://infertilityawareness.org/
http://www.resolve.org/

Have you experienced infertility? If so, what are some of the resources that you found to be most helpful?

Author Info

Lauren Soderberg

Wife of one tall drink of water. Mama of two spunky kids. Lover of awkwardly long hashtags and unicorn emojis. And babies, obviously.

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