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How the Owlet Monitor Put This Preemie Mom’s Mind to Rest.

August 17, 2016

How the Owlet Monitor put this Preemie mom’s mind to rest. I’m so excited to be partnering with Owlet and their Night in the Life series. Many of you have never heard of me but I’m Lindsay with Frenchie and I first heard about the Owlet Monitor on Facebook. It caught my attention because I had just had a baby born at 24.5 weeks’ gestation and he was the smallest little thing you ever saw. His name is Malakai and I’ve had ¾ children in the NICU and so this was nothing new to me. What was new was all the new technology that had been released in the last 5 years since my daughter, Leila, was born.

Malakai Fekitoa Owlet Frenchie

Let me give you some history. My oldest, Freddie, was born at 34 weeks and needed no breathing support. My son Siaki was born full term and continues to be a spit-fire. Leila was born at 30 weeks and needed a day of oxygen but Malakai was a whole other ball game when it comes to premature babies. He was born the morning of September 30, 2015 and my husband wasn’t even there because it became an emergency situation very fast. He was delivered via cesarean and all I was told was that he was born alive. He was born weighing 1.65lbs., I had never thought babies could live and be that small. For any mother, the thought is unimaginable but for any woman who has lost a child, I started to feel empathy really quick. I wanted my son to survive, I wanted him to have a thriving life and at that point so much was left unknown. It still is but he has progressed more than I ever imagined and a lot of the reasoning behind that is that I was proactive in his care from the start.

Malakai Fekitoa baby

He spent 129 days in the NICU at Intermountain Medical Center. He developed Chronic Lung Disease from the mechanical breathing supports he was on. He also had apnea because of his prematurity and because of this the monitors would beep constantly. Three weeks in he developed pneumonia and almost didn’t make it all together. I am so grateful for the doctors and nurses and all the care they took of my son but in February it was my time to take him home. We had to bring him home on a small amount of oxygen and he needed constant weight checks to be sure he was growing like he should have been. When he was on oxygen, the insurance supplied us our own monitor and it would beep so loud that it often would wake up the baby and pretty much the entire house. Having that monitor made me feel a bit more comfortable because I knew what his stats were and what I needed to adjust on his machines. I was so happy to hear that in April we got the go-ahead and do strictly room air. No more tanks or monitors to lug around, I could also finally leave my room with him with no wires attached and that in itself was the biggest hurdle.

However, we were still not in the clear with in regards to diseases he could contract easier than others. I used the Owlet nightly and got my money’s worth x10 because I was able to check his stats without waking him and be comforted in knowing how high his saturations were, and when I needed to help him remember to take those breaths everyone needs.

Premature babies and Owlet Monitor

The Owlet puts this preemie mom’s mind at ease because the simple fact that my son fought to be here, I want to be sure that he is monitored well and taken care of the best way I know how. This technology has helped having a premature baby a little easier, I wish that it had been available when I had Leila and I probably would suffer from less anxiety than I already do. He doesn’t even know this is on his foot and it has been one of the best things to ever come into our lives. Thank you, Owlet.

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Products in this Article

The Smart Sock comfortably wraps around your baby’s foot to track heart rate and oxygen levels using clinically-proven pulse oximetry. The base station glows green to let you know everything is okay but will notify with lights and sounds if something appears to be wrong.

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